Sexual Abuse / Rape

Sexual Abuse / Rape

What is Sexual Abuse / Rape?

Sexual abuse, both in childhood and later in life, as well as sexual assault and rape, are very prevalent crimes that can have a negative influence on the lives of women, children, and men.

Victims may have a variety of psychological repercussions for many years after the attack or abuse occurred. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, psychosexual disorders, self-harming, substance addiction, and other conditions can all be problems.

Unfortunately, the media frequently promotes the concept that victims of sexual assault and abuse are permanently damaged and are serving a "life sentence," while our culture sometimes pushes individuals to search for blame in the victim's behavior.


If you've been the victim of social assault, abuse, or rape, you've undoubtedly dealt with some of the concerns listed above.

In truth, while victims of these heinous crimes frequently struggle for years with the resulting psychological fallout, you may recover with the right therapy and support. Sexual assault and rape do not have to result in a "life sentence." Support, especially psychotherapy, may make all the difference.

Support During a Crisis

Someone who has lately experienced abuse or assault may be in distress. The event itself, as well as subsequent events involving police and medical personnel, may be quite distressing. Psychological help at this tough time can shorten the healing process and reduce the danger of long-term psychological harm.

Support Over Time

Frequently, victims of sexual crime do not seek psychological assistance for many years after their experience. Adults who were abused as children may discover that a tough or critical point in their adult life "brings it all back"; if this describes you, it might have been when you became a parent, during a marital conflict, or in the case of another assault. A psychotherapist can work with you to understand about the tough feelings you are experiencing as a result of what has happened by employing cognitive behavioral therapy or eye movement desensitization reprocessing. Many victims, for example, struggle with self-blame and might learn how to focus on their strength in surviving such a traumatic occurrence. You can also learn how to better regulate your emotional emotions when you think about or discuss what happened. You may achieve healing with time and patience.


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